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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Burning Mouth Syndrome Is Often Difficult to Diagnose

Oral pain that feels like a scalded mouth and can last for months has baffled dental researchers since the 1970s, when burning oral sensations were linked to mucosal, periodontal, and restorative disorders and mental or emotional causes.

It's called burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and it's gaining the attention of such dental researchers as oral pain expert Andres Pinto, who recently joined Case Western Reserve University's School of Dental Medicine faculty.



For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, September 25, 2017

No Need To Toss Your Toothbrush After A Sore Throat

Word on the street has it you should replace your toothbrush after suffering from a cold, the flu or a bout of strep throat. That may not be necessary - at least when it comes to sore throats, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Some health care professionals advise children to toss their toothbrushes if they have been diagnosed with strep throat. Researchers from University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston wanted to determine if that advice is warranted.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/260112.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Practical Oral Care for People With Autism

Providing oral care to people with autism requires adaptation of the skills you use every day. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of autism can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This booklet will help you make a difference in the lives of people who need professional oral care.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that impairs communication and social, behavioral, and intellectual functioning. Some people with the disorder appear distant, aloof, or detached from other people or from their surroundings. Others do not react appropriately to common verbal and social cues, such as a parent's tone of voice or smile. Obsessive routines, repetitive behaviors, unpredictable body movements, and self-injurious behavior may all be symptoms that complicate dental care.

Autism varies widely in symptoms and severity, and some people have coexisting conditions such as intellectual disability or epilepsy. They can be among the most challenging of patients, but following the suggestions in this booklet can help make their dental treatment successful.

For Full Article: http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/nidcr2.nih.gov/Templates/CommonPage.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID=%7b6CCEB28B-FDB0-4037-999A-5DAECEA6FBE9%7d&NRORIGINALURL=%2fOralHealth%2fTopics%2fDevelopmentalDisabilities%2fPracticalOralCarePeopleAutism%2ehtm&NRCACHEHINT=Guest#7

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

The management of traumatic tooth loss with dental implants

Br Dent J. 2014 Dec 5;217(11):627-33. doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2014.1050.
Chesterman J, Chauhan R, Patel M, Chan MF.


Traumatic dental injuries are relatively common causes of emergency presentation to general dental practitioners. There are well established guidelines for the management of traumatised teeth, which practitioners should be familiar with and able to deliver. Some teeth, however, are either lost at the time of injury or are found to have a hopeless long-term prognosis despite appropriate treatment. The first article in this two-part series covers the important aspects of maintaining teeth where possible, to preserve the supporting hard and soft tissues. It then describes the replacement of a single tooth lost due to trauma and the relative challenges faced. The second article covers more extensive trauma, involving multiple teeth and where significant supporting tissues are lost. It describes the replacement of teeth, including the hard and soft tissues with implant supported restorations, whilst highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary team in severe cases.

For Full Article: http://www.dentalarticles.com/pdf/?action=viewArticle&articleId=2426

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease

Two studies presented at the 87th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) in Miami provide stronger indications of a possible relationship between obesity and periodontal disease. Both studies, conducted by researchers from Harvard University1 and the University of Puerto Rico,2 attracted online news coverage from Medical News Today,3 United Press International,4 and USA Today.5

The first study was an analysis of data from nearly 37,000 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a long-term evaluation of nutrition and other health factors with disease incidence in male health professionals (at least half of whom are dentists). The study population did not have periodontal disease at baseline, and 3,340 of the men provided their first report of periodontal disease during the 16-year follow-up period (1986 to 2002). Overall, the scientists found that male health professionals who met the standard level of obesity [body-mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2] were at 29 percent higher risk for developing periodontitis.

For more information: http://www.ada.org/3129.aspx

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay

A Swedish study found almost all Swedes brush their teeth, but only one in ten brushes teeth in a way that effectively prevents tooth decay. Now researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, are eager to teach Swedes how to brush their teeth more effectively.

Most Swedes regularly brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste. But only few know the best brushing technique, how the toothpaste should be used and how fluoride prevents tooth decay.

Read more: Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay | MedIndia http://www.medindia.net/news/most-people-dont-brush-their-teeth-effectively-to-prevent-tooth-decay-101347-1.htm#ixzz1v2xWnTUD

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Poor Oral Health Linked to Cancer-Causing Oral HPV Infection

Poor oral health, including gum disease and dental problems, was found to be associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which causes about 40 percent to 80 percent of oropharyngeal cancers, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Poor oral health is a new independent risk factor for oral HPV infection and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine this association," said Thanh Cong Bui, Dr.P.H., postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. "The good news is, this risk factor is modifiable -- by maintaining good oral hygiene and good oral health, one can prevent HPV infection and subsequent HPV-related cancers."

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130821132341.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.