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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Health effects of e-cigarettes

Over the past few years, innovations in nicotine delivery have enabled smokers to obtain their nicotine without the carcinogens found in cigarette smoke. Electronic cigarettes are becoming very popular, as they have the look and feel of real cigarettes. Publicized as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, electronic cigarettes are supposed to give smokers their nicotine fix without the cancer-causing side effects of tobacco.

However, there are some serious concerns that the battery-operated devices may actually pose more dangers to users. There are many things we have yet to determine about the possible impact of electronic cigarettes on the health of the public.

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/06/health-effects-of-e-cigarettes.html

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Oral Health Findings Can Help Identify Unrecognized Diabetes

The July 2011 issue of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR) features a study from Columbia University on a simple algorithm that could identify nearly 3 out of 4 cases of unrecognized diabetes or pre-diabetes.1 The screening algorithm evaluated only two dental parameters: number of missing teeth, and percentage of deep periodontal pockets (at least 5 millimeters in depth). Adding a point-of-care glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) test significantly improved identification of diabetic and pre-diabetic individuals, raising screening accuracy to 92 percent sensitivity. The study received national news coverage from United Press International and other news agencies.

For more information: http://www.ada.org/6063.aspx

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Guidelines to save traumatized teeth

Teeth affected by a traumatic injury can often be saved, and newly revised guidelines from the American Association of Endodontists can help dental professionals quickly determine the best course of action to treat traumatic dental injuries. The Recommended Guidelines of the AAE for the Treatment of Traumatic Dental Injuries features treatment protocols for a variety of traumatic dental injuries including fracture, luxation, subluxation, concussion and avulsion. The Guidelines include diagnosis, treatment, patient instruction and follow-up procedures.

Initially developed by the AAE in 2004, the revised Guidelines are based on the International Association of Dental Trauma Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries to ensure consistency in addressing acute phase treatment while focusing on post-traumatic endodontic care. "The revised AAE Guidelines provide important support for dental and medical professionals who encounter dental trauma," said Dr. Linda G. Levin, chair of the AAE special committee to revise the trauma guidelines. "They also provide a foundation for instructions for lay people who often provide 'first encounter' emergency care for the dental trauma patient."

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268186.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Improving gum health may reduce heart risk

Researchers at Columbia University in New York suggest that if you look after your gums, you could also be reducing your risk of heart disease. They claim that improving dental care slows the speed with which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Writing in a recent online issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, they report a prospective study that shows how improving gum health is linked to a clinically significant slower progression of atherosclerosis, the process where plaque builds up in arteries and increases a person's risk of heart disease, stroke and death.

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268325.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Preventing dental implant infections

One million dental implants are inserted every year in Germany, and often they need to be replaced due to issues such as tissue infections caused by bacteria. In the future, these infections will be prevented thanks to a new plasma implant coating that kills pathogens using silver ions.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151104130046.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Dental implants frequently lead to complications

Almost 8 percent of patients experience loss of at least one implant within ten years. Even more develop peri-implantitis. Patients with periodontitis run a greater risk of both implant loss and peri-implantitis. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has explored the various issues.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151105092010.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.


Monday, December 26, 2016

Bringing needed immune cells to inflamed tissue to treat gum disease

The red, swollen and painful gums and bone destruction of periodontal disease could be effectively treated by beckoning the right kind of immune system cells to the inflamed tissues, according to a new animal study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Their findings, published this week in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offer a new therapeutic paradigm for a condition that afflicts 78 million people in the U.S. alone.

Periodontal disease currently is treated by keeping oral bacteria in check with daily brushing and flossing as well as regular professional deep cleaning with scaling and root planing, which remove tartar above and below the gum line. In some hard-to-treat cases, antibiotics are given. These strategies of mechanical tartar removal and antimicrobial delivery aim to reduce the amount of oral bacteria on the tooth surface, explained co-author and co-investigator Charles Sfeir, D.D.S., Ph.D., director, Center for Craniofacial Regeneration and associate professor, Departments of Periodontics and Oral Biology, Pitt's School of Dental Medicine.

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268322.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.