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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

FDA Orders Safety Review of TMJ Implants

The Food and Drug Administration has ordered a review of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants performance of artificial jaw joint implants after finding a substantial number of problems with the products in recent years.

The action comes just months after an investigation by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today found that the agency had approved four such devices beginning in 1999, despite weak and incomplete research clouded by potential conflicts of interest.

For Full Article: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/news/fda-orders-safety-review-of-tmj-implants.aspx

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Monday, April 11, 2016

Are Amalgam Fillings Safe?

The FDA has deemed them harmless, but concern over the safety of amalgam dental fillings — those silver-colored fillings that contain a mixture of liquid mercury and a powdered silver, tin, and copper alloy — persists. Here's what you should know.

For Full Article: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/mercury-mouth-are-amalgam-fillings-safe.aspx

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education



Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Health effects of e-cigarettes

Over the past few years, innovations in nicotine delivery have enabled smokers to obtain their nicotine without the carcinogens found in cigarette smoke. Electronic cigarettes are becoming very popular, as they have the look and feel of real cigarettes. Publicized as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, electronic cigarettes are supposed to give smokers their nicotine fix without the cancer-causing side effects of tobacco.

However, there are some serious concerns that the battery-operated devices may actually pose more dangers to users. There are many things we have yet to determine about the possible impact of electronic cigarettes on the health of the public.

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/06/health-effects-of-e-cigarettes.html

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education


Monday, March 7, 2016

The management of traumatic tooth loss with dental implants

Br Dent J. 2014 Dec 5;217(11):627-33. doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2014.1050.
Chesterman J, Chauhan R, Patel M, Chan MF.


Traumatic dental injuries are relatively common causes of emergency presentation to general dental practitioners. There are well established guidelines for the management of traumatised teeth, which practitioners should be familiar with and able to deliver. Some teeth, however, are either lost at the time of injury or are found to have a hopeless long-term prognosis despite appropriate treatment. The first article in this two-part series covers the important aspects of maintaining teeth where possible, to preserve the supporting hard and soft tissues. It then describes the replacement of a single tooth lost due to trauma and the relative challenges faced. The second article covers more extensive trauma, involving multiple teeth and where significant supporting tissues are lost. It describes the replacement of teeth, including the hard and soft tissues with implant supported restorations, whilst highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary team in severe cases.

For Full Article: http://www.dentalarticles.com/pdf/?action=viewArticle&articleId=2426

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma: Are you at risk?

Esophageal cancer is a cancerous (malignant) tumor of the esophagus, the muscular tube that moves food from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal cancer is not very common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. Two main types of esophageal cancer exist: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types look different from each other under the microscope.(1)

“Once a rare cancer representing only 5 percent of all esophageal cancers in the United States, esophageal adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the fastest-rising incidence — six-fold increase in the past three decades — and currently comprises more than 80 % of all new esophageal cancer cases in this country,” said Xifeng Wu, M.D., chair of the Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston. “To reduce the mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma, the best hope in the near term is to detect it at its early stage, or even better, to prevent the progression of esophageal adenocarcinoma from its premalignant lesion, which is called Barrett’s esophagus.”(2)

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/04/esophageal-cancer.html

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Regrow a tooth? Fish, yes; humans, maybe some day

When a Lake Malawi cichlid loses a tooth, a new one drops neatly into place as a replacement. Why can't humans similarly regrow teeth lost to injury or disease?

Working with hundreds of these colorful fish, researchers are beginning to understanding how the animals maintain their hundreds of teeth throughout their adult lives. By studying how structures in embryonic fish differentiate into either teeth or taste buds, the researchers hope to one day be able to turn on the tooth regeneration mechanism in humans -- which, like other mammals, get only two sets of teeth to last a lifetime.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151019154108.htm

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ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Preventing dental implant infections

One million dental implants are inserted every year in Germany, and often they need to be replaced due to issues such as tissue infections caused by bacteria. In the future, these infections will be prevented thanks to a new plasma implant coating that kills pathogens using silver ions.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151104130046.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education