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Thursday, August 10, 2017

Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease

Two studies presented at the 87th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) in Miami provide stronger indications of a possible relationship between obesity and periodontal disease. Both studies, conducted by researchers from Harvard University1 and the University of Puerto Rico,2 attracted online news coverage from Medical News Today,3 United Press International,4 and USA Today.5

The first study was an analysis of data from nearly 37,000 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a long-term evaluation of nutrition and other health factors with disease incidence in male health professionals (at least half of whom are dentists). The study population did not have periodontal disease at baseline, and 3,340 of the men provided their first report of periodontal disease during the 16-year follow-up period (1986 to 2002). Overall, the scientists found that male health professionals who met the standard level of obesity [body-mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2] were at 29 percent higher risk for developing periodontitis.

For more information: http://www.ada.org/3129.aspx

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Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay

A Swedish study found almost all Swedes brush their teeth, but only one in ten brushes teeth in a way that effectively prevents tooth decay. Now researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, are eager to teach Swedes how to brush their teeth more effectively.

Most Swedes regularly brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste. But only few know the best brushing technique, how the toothpaste should be used and how fluoride prevents tooth decay.

Read more: Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay | MedIndia http://www.medindia.net/news/most-people-dont-brush-their-teeth-effectively-to-prevent-tooth-decay-101347-1.htm#ixzz1v2xWnTUD

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Poor Oral Health Linked to Cancer-Causing Oral HPV Infection

Poor oral health, including gum disease and dental problems, was found to be associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which causes about 40 percent to 80 percent of oropharyngeal cancers, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Poor oral health is a new independent risk factor for oral HPV infection and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine this association," said Thanh Cong Bui, Dr.P.H., postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. "The good news is, this risk factor is modifiable -- by maintaining good oral hygiene and good oral health, one can prevent HPV infection and subsequent HPV-related cancers."

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130821132341.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Regrow a tooth? Fish, yes; humans, maybe some day

When a Lake Malawi cichlid loses a tooth, a new one drops neatly into place as a replacement. Why can't humans similarly regrow teeth lost to injury or disease?

Working with hundreds of these colorful fish, researchers are beginning to understanding how the animals maintain their hundreds of teeth throughout their adult lives. By studying how structures in embryonic fish differentiate into either teeth or taste buds, the researchers hope to one day be able to turn on the tooth regeneration mechanism in humans -- which, like other mammals, get only two sets of teeth to last a lifetime.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151019154108.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Women six times 'more disgusted by dental treatment' than men

After looking at pictures of dental treatment scenes, researchers discovered that female patients scared of the dentist were six times more likely to be disgusted with what they saw, compared with non-dental phobic women.

In a battle of the sexes, dental phobic women struggled to hide their emotions. Although both men and woman faired equally when asked about their feelings towards the dentist, women afraid of the dentist were more repulsed than their men counterparts.

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/266546.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Graphene oxide could make stronger dental fillings

Graphene oxide could be used to make super strong dental fillings that don't corrode, according to a new study. Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings.  

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151203082205.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma: Are you at risk?

Esophageal cancer is a cancerous (malignant) tumor of the esophagus, the muscular tube that moves food from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal cancer is not very common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. Two main types of esophageal cancer exist: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types look different from each other under the microscope.(1)

“Once a rare cancer representing only 5 percent of all esophageal cancers in the United States, esophageal adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the fastest-rising incidence — six-fold increase in the past three decades — and currently comprises more than 80 % of all new esophageal cancer cases in this country,” said Xifeng Wu, M.D., chair of the Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston. “To reduce the mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma, the best hope in the near term is to detect it at its early stage, or even better, to prevent the progression of esophageal adenocarcinoma from its premalignant lesion, which is called Barrett’s esophagus.”(2)

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/04/esophageal-cancer.html

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.