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Thursday, December 7, 2017

A Glass of Milk After Eating Sugary Cereals May Prevent Cavities

Washing down sugary breakfast cereal with milk after eating reduces plaque acid levels and may prevent damage to tooth enamel that leads to cavities, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry.

Dry ready-to-eat, sugar-added cereals combine refined sugar and starch. When those carbohydrates are consumed, bacteria in the dental plaque on tooth surfaces produce acids, says Christine Wu, professor of pediatric dentistry and director of cariology, who served as principal investigator of the study.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731164718.htm

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Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Alzheimer's disease linked to poor dental health

A study has found that people with poor oral hygiene or gum disease could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's compared with those who have healthy teeth.

Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, discovered the presence of a bacterium called Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of patients who had dementia when they were alive. The bug is usually associated with chronic periodontal (gum) disease.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Cheese And Dairy Products May Prevent Cavities

Consuming dairy products is vital to maintaining good overall health, and it's especially important to bone health. But there has been little research about how dairy products affect oral health in particular. However, according to a new study published in the May/June 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), consuming cheese and other dairy products may help protect teeth against cavities.

The study sampled 68 subjects ranging in age from 12 to 15, and the authors looked at the dental plaque pH in the subjects' mouths before and after they consumed cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. A pH level lower than 5.5 puts a person at risk for tooth erosion, which is a process that wears away the enamel (or protective outside layer) of teeth. "The higher the pH level is above 5.5, the lower the chance of developing cavities," explains Vipul Yadav, MDS, lead author of the study.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/261550.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Erosion of tooth enamel from soda pop is permanent

You may be saving calories by drinking diet soda, but when it comes to enamel erosion of your teeth, it's no better than regular soda.

In the last 25 years, Kim McFarland, D.D.S., associate professor in the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry in Lincoln, has seen an increase in the number of dental patients with erosion of the tooth enamel - the protective layer of the tooth. Once erosion occurs, it can't be reversed and affects people their whole life.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/263812.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Burning Mouth Syndrome Is Often Difficult to Diagnose

Oral pain that feels like a scalded mouth and can last for months has baffled dental researchers since the 1970s, when burning oral sensations were linked to mucosal, periodontal, and restorative disorders and mental or emotional causes.

It's called burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and it's gaining the attention of such dental researchers as oral pain expert Andres Pinto, who recently joined Case Western Reserve University's School of Dental Medicine faculty.



For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, September 25, 2017

No Need To Toss Your Toothbrush After A Sore Throat

Word on the street has it you should replace your toothbrush after suffering from a cold, the flu or a bout of strep throat. That may not be necessary - at least when it comes to sore throats, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Some health care professionals advise children to toss their toothbrushes if they have been diagnosed with strep throat. Researchers from University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston wanted to determine if that advice is warranted.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/260112.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Practical Oral Care for People With Autism

Providing oral care to people with autism requires adaptation of the skills you use every day. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of autism can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This booklet will help you make a difference in the lives of people who need professional oral care.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that impairs communication and social, behavioral, and intellectual functioning. Some people with the disorder appear distant, aloof, or detached from other people or from their surroundings. Others do not react appropriately to common verbal and social cues, such as a parent's tone of voice or smile. Obsessive routines, repetitive behaviors, unpredictable body movements, and self-injurious behavior may all be symptoms that complicate dental care.

Autism varies widely in symptoms and severity, and some people have coexisting conditions such as intellectual disability or epilepsy. They can be among the most challenging of patients, but following the suggestions in this booklet can help make their dental treatment successful.

For Full Article: http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/nidcr2.nih.gov/Templates/CommonPage.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID=%7b6CCEB28B-FDB0-4037-999A-5DAECEA6FBE9%7d&NRORIGINALURL=%2fOralHealth%2fTopics%2fDevelopmentalDisabilities%2fPracticalOralCarePeopleAutism%2ehtm&NRCACHEHINT=Guest#7

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.