Home  |   About Us  |   Courses  |   Q & A  |   Contact Us     888-844-ACES     www.aces4ce.com

Thursday, December 7, 2017

A Glass of Milk After Eating Sugary Cereals May Prevent Cavities

Washing down sugary breakfast cereal with milk after eating reduces plaque acid levels and may prevent damage to tooth enamel that leads to cavities, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry.

Dry ready-to-eat, sugar-added cereals combine refined sugar and starch. When those carbohydrates are consumed, bacteria in the dental plaque on tooth surfaces produce acids, says Christine Wu, professor of pediatric dentistry and director of cariology, who served as principal investigator of the study.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731164718.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Alzheimer's disease linked to poor dental health

A study has found that people with poor oral hygiene or gum disease could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's compared with those who have healthy teeth.

Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in the UK, discovered the presence of a bacterium called Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of patients who had dementia when they were alive. The bug is usually associated with chronic periodontal (gum) disease.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Cheese And Dairy Products May Prevent Cavities

Consuming dairy products is vital to maintaining good overall health, and it's especially important to bone health. But there has been little research about how dairy products affect oral health in particular. However, according to a new study published in the May/June 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), consuming cheese and other dairy products may help protect teeth against cavities.

The study sampled 68 subjects ranging in age from 12 to 15, and the authors looked at the dental plaque pH in the subjects' mouths before and after they consumed cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. A pH level lower than 5.5 puts a person at risk for tooth erosion, which is a process that wears away the enamel (or protective outside layer) of teeth. "The higher the pH level is above 5.5, the lower the chance of developing cavities," explains Vipul Yadav, MDS, lead author of the study.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/261550.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Erosion of tooth enamel from soda pop is permanent

You may be saving calories by drinking diet soda, but when it comes to enamel erosion of your teeth, it's no better than regular soda.

In the last 25 years, Kim McFarland, D.D.S., associate professor in the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry in Lincoln, has seen an increase in the number of dental patients with erosion of the tooth enamel - the protective layer of the tooth. Once erosion occurs, it can't be reversed and affects people their whole life.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/263812.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Burning Mouth Syndrome Is Often Difficult to Diagnose

Oral pain that feels like a scalded mouth and can last for months has baffled dental researchers since the 1970s, when burning oral sensations were linked to mucosal, periodontal, and restorative disorders and mental or emotional causes.

It's called burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and it's gaining the attention of such dental researchers as oral pain expert Andres Pinto, who recently joined Case Western Reserve University's School of Dental Medicine faculty.



For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, September 25, 2017

No Need To Toss Your Toothbrush After A Sore Throat

Word on the street has it you should replace your toothbrush after suffering from a cold, the flu or a bout of strep throat. That may not be necessary - at least when it comes to sore throats, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC.

Some health care professionals advise children to toss their toothbrushes if they have been diagnosed with strep throat. Researchers from University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston wanted to determine if that advice is warranted.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/260112.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Practical Oral Care for People With Autism

Providing oral care to people with autism requires adaptation of the skills you use every day. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of autism can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This booklet will help you make a difference in the lives of people who need professional oral care.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that impairs communication and social, behavioral, and intellectual functioning. Some people with the disorder appear distant, aloof, or detached from other people or from their surroundings. Others do not react appropriately to common verbal and social cues, such as a parent's tone of voice or smile. Obsessive routines, repetitive behaviors, unpredictable body movements, and self-injurious behavior may all be symptoms that complicate dental care.

Autism varies widely in symptoms and severity, and some people have coexisting conditions such as intellectual disability or epilepsy. They can be among the most challenging of patients, but following the suggestions in this booklet can help make their dental treatment successful.

For Full Article: http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/nidcr2.nih.gov/Templates/CommonPage.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID=%7b6CCEB28B-FDB0-4037-999A-5DAECEA6FBE9%7d&NRORIGINALURL=%2fOralHealth%2fTopics%2fDevelopmentalDisabilities%2fPracticalOralCarePeopleAutism%2ehtm&NRCACHEHINT=Guest#7

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

The management of traumatic tooth loss with dental implants

Br Dent J. 2014 Dec 5;217(11):627-33. doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2014.1050.
Chesterman J, Chauhan R, Patel M, Chan MF.


Traumatic dental injuries are relatively common causes of emergency presentation to general dental practitioners. There are well established guidelines for the management of traumatised teeth, which practitioners should be familiar with and able to deliver. Some teeth, however, are either lost at the time of injury or are found to have a hopeless long-term prognosis despite appropriate treatment. The first article in this two-part series covers the important aspects of maintaining teeth where possible, to preserve the supporting hard and soft tissues. It then describes the replacement of a single tooth lost due to trauma and the relative challenges faced. The second article covers more extensive trauma, involving multiple teeth and where significant supporting tissues are lost. It describes the replacement of teeth, including the hard and soft tissues with implant supported restorations, whilst highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary team in severe cases.

For Full Article: http://www.dentalarticles.com/pdf/?action=viewArticle&articleId=2426

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease

Two studies presented at the 87th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) in Miami provide stronger indications of a possible relationship between obesity and periodontal disease. Both studies, conducted by researchers from Harvard University1 and the University of Puerto Rico,2 attracted online news coverage from Medical News Today,3 United Press International,4 and USA Today.5

The first study was an analysis of data from nearly 37,000 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a long-term evaluation of nutrition and other health factors with disease incidence in male health professionals (at least half of whom are dentists). The study population did not have periodontal disease at baseline, and 3,340 of the men provided their first report of periodontal disease during the 16-year follow-up period (1986 to 2002). Overall, the scientists found that male health professionals who met the standard level of obesity [body-mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2] were at 29 percent higher risk for developing periodontitis.

For more information: http://www.ada.org/3129.aspx

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay

A Swedish study found almost all Swedes brush their teeth, but only one in ten brushes teeth in a way that effectively prevents tooth decay. Now researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, are eager to teach Swedes how to brush their teeth more effectively.

Most Swedes regularly brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste. But only few know the best brushing technique, how the toothpaste should be used and how fluoride prevents tooth decay.

Read more: Most People Don't Brush Their Teeth Effectively to Prevent Tooth Decay | MedIndia http://www.medindia.net/news/most-people-dont-brush-their-teeth-effectively-to-prevent-tooth-decay-101347-1.htm#ixzz1v2xWnTUD

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Poor Oral Health Linked to Cancer-Causing Oral HPV Infection

Poor oral health, including gum disease and dental problems, was found to be associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which causes about 40 percent to 80 percent of oropharyngeal cancers, according to a study published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Poor oral health is a new independent risk factor for oral HPV infection and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine this association," said Thanh Cong Bui, Dr.P.H., postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. "The good news is, this risk factor is modifiable -- by maintaining good oral hygiene and good oral health, one can prevent HPV infection and subsequent HPV-related cancers."

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130821132341.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Regrow a tooth? Fish, yes; humans, maybe some day

When a Lake Malawi cichlid loses a tooth, a new one drops neatly into place as a replacement. Why can't humans similarly regrow teeth lost to injury or disease?

Working with hundreds of these colorful fish, researchers are beginning to understanding how the animals maintain their hundreds of teeth throughout their adult lives. By studying how structures in embryonic fish differentiate into either teeth or taste buds, the researchers hope to one day be able to turn on the tooth regeneration mechanism in humans -- which, like other mammals, get only two sets of teeth to last a lifetime.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151019154108.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Women six times 'more disgusted by dental treatment' than men

After looking at pictures of dental treatment scenes, researchers discovered that female patients scared of the dentist were six times more likely to be disgusted with what they saw, compared with non-dental phobic women.

In a battle of the sexes, dental phobic women struggled to hide their emotions. Although both men and woman faired equally when asked about their feelings towards the dentist, women afraid of the dentist were more repulsed than their men counterparts.

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/266546.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Graphene oxide could make stronger dental fillings

Graphene oxide could be used to make super strong dental fillings that don't corrode, according to a new study. Research suggests we chew around 800 times in an average meal; that's almost a million times a year. We put our teeth under huge strain, and often require fillings to repair them. Fillings are typically made of a mixture of metals, such as copper, mercury, silver and tin, or composites of powdered glass and ceramic. Typical metal fillings can corrode and composite fillings are not very strong; Graphene on the other hand is 200 times stronger than steel and doesn't corrode, making it a prime new candidate for dental fillings.  

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151203082205.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma: Are you at risk?

Esophageal cancer is a cancerous (malignant) tumor of the esophagus, the muscular tube that moves food from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal cancer is not very common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. Two main types of esophageal cancer exist: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types look different from each other under the microscope.(1)

“Once a rare cancer representing only 5 percent of all esophageal cancers in the United States, esophageal adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the fastest-rising incidence — six-fold increase in the past three decades — and currently comprises more than 80 % of all new esophageal cancer cases in this country,” said Xifeng Wu, M.D., chair of the Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston. “To reduce the mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma, the best hope in the near term is to detect it at its early stage, or even better, to prevent the progression of esophageal adenocarcinoma from its premalignant lesion, which is called Barrett’s esophagus.”(2)

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/04/esophageal-cancer.html

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Gingivitis Bacteria Manipulate Your Immune System So They Can Thrive in Your Gums

A new research report published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology shows how the bacteria known for causing gum disease--Porphyromonas gingivalis--manipulates the body's immune system to disable normal processes that would otherwise destroy it. Specifically, the report shows that this pathogen prompts the production of the anti-inflammatory molecule Interleukin-10 (IL-10). This, in turn, inhibits the function of T-cells, which would otherwise help to protect the host from this particular microbial infection.

For Full Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/260112.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

FDA Orders Safety Review of TMJ Implants

The Food and Drug Administration has ordered a review of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants performance of artificial jaw joint implants after finding a substantial number of problems with the products in recent years.

The action comes just months after an investigation by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and MedPage Today found that the agency had approved four such devices beginning in 1999, despite weak and incomplete research clouded by potential conflicts of interest.

For Full Article: http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/news/fda-orders-safety-review-of-tmj-implants.aspx

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.




Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Health effects of e-cigarettes

Over the past few years, innovations in nicotine delivery have enabled smokers to obtain their nicotine without the carcinogens found in cigarette smoke. Electronic cigarettes are becoming very popular, as they have the look and feel of real cigarettes. Publicized as a safer alternative to traditional smoking, electronic cigarettes are supposed to give smokers their nicotine fix without the cancer-causing side effects of tobacco.

However, there are some serious concerns that the battery-operated devices may actually pose more dangers to users. There are many things we have yet to determine about the possible impact of electronic cigarettes on the health of the public.

For Full Article: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/06/health-effects-of-e-cigarettes.html

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Oral Health Findings Can Help Identify Unrecognized Diabetes

The July 2011 issue of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR) features a study from Columbia University on a simple algorithm that could identify nearly 3 out of 4 cases of unrecognized diabetes or pre-diabetes.1 The screening algorithm evaluated only two dental parameters: number of missing teeth, and percentage of deep periodontal pockets (at least 5 millimeters in depth). Adding a point-of-care glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) test significantly improved identification of diabetic and pre-diabetic individuals, raising screening accuracy to 92 percent sensitivity. The study received national news coverage from United Press International and other news agencies.

For more information: http://www.ada.org/6063.aspx

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Guidelines to save traumatized teeth

Teeth affected by a traumatic injury can often be saved, and newly revised guidelines from the American Association of Endodontists can help dental professionals quickly determine the best course of action to treat traumatic dental injuries. The Recommended Guidelines of the AAE for the Treatment of Traumatic Dental Injuries features treatment protocols for a variety of traumatic dental injuries including fracture, luxation, subluxation, concussion and avulsion. The Guidelines include diagnosis, treatment, patient instruction and follow-up procedures.

Initially developed by the AAE in 2004, the revised Guidelines are based on the International Association of Dental Trauma Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries to ensure consistency in addressing acute phase treatment while focusing on post-traumatic endodontic care. "The revised AAE Guidelines provide important support for dental and medical professionals who encounter dental trauma," said Dr. Linda G. Levin, chair of the AAE special committee to revise the trauma guidelines. "They also provide a foundation for instructions for lay people who often provide 'first encounter' emergency care for the dental trauma patient."

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/268186.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Improving gum health may reduce heart risk

Researchers at Columbia University in New York suggest that if you look after your gums, you could also be reducing your risk of heart disease. They claim that improving dental care slows the speed with which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Writing in a recent online issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association, they report a prospective study that shows how improving gum health is linked to a clinically significant slower progression of atherosclerosis, the process where plaque builds up in arteries and increases a person's risk of heart disease, stroke and death.

For Full article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268325.php

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Preventing dental implant infections

One million dental implants are inserted every year in Germany, and often they need to be replaced due to issues such as tissue infections caused by bacteria. In the future, these infections will be prevented thanks to a new plasma implant coating that kills pathogens using silver ions.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151104130046.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Dental implants frequently lead to complications

Almost 8 percent of patients experience loss of at least one implant within ten years. Even more develop peri-implantitis. Patients with periodontitis run a greater risk of both implant loss and peri-implantitis. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has explored the various issues.

For Full Article: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151105092010.htm

Website supported by www.aces4ce.com
ACES is the world's leader in providing live webcast dental continuing education

Disclaimer

Content on this blog are for informational purposes only, is neither intended to and does not establish a standard of care, and is not a substitute for professional judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. ACES is not responsible for information on external websites linked to this website.